Slavic & East European Collections
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  HISTORY
1892 A.D. White, Cornell's first president and US Ambassador to Russia, launched the Slavic and East European collections with the gift of his personal library.
1940s US Army training programs at Cornell during WWII further developed the Russian collections.
1960s Ford Foundation funds greatly augmented the collections and expanded coverage to East Europe.
 
STRENGTHS
  • Russian language & literature, including émigre literature 
  • Slavic linguistics
  • Russian history
  • Russian & East European economics
  • Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Czech and Slovak materials
 
INDIVIDUALS
ALEXIS BABINE organized the fledgling Russian collection at Cornell in the 1890s and later became the first Slavic librarian at the Library of Congress.
VLADIMIR NABOKOV taught Russian literature at Cornell in the 1950s and inspired dramatic improvement in the library's literary collections.
 
COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT POLICY
 
NUMBERS
over 300,000 volumes : books, serials, monographic series, survey data and statistics, maps, newspapers, video and audio recordings, manuscripts, and archival materials
LANGUAGE HOLDINGS
Russian
Polish
Czech and Slovak
Serbian and Croatian
Ukrainian
Belorussian
Other

56%
13%
7.5%
10%
3%
2%
7%
 
DIVERSITY
OLIN LIBRARY
humanities and social sciences Slavic Studies seminar room [core reference collection 100 journals literaturelinguisticshistorygovernmenteconomics]
MUSIC LIBRARY
Russian music

FINE ARTS LIBRARY
Russian architecture city and regional planning

 
CONTEMPORARY COLLECTIONS
Hungarian Transition to Democracy: a range of materials including two sets of interviews with key Hungarian political figures, both before and after the change

 Polish Resistance from 1970 to Now: 2,500 underground publications, as well as leaflets, flyers, and posters of the Solidarity trade union